FAQ: What Is The Most Common Size Bike Pedals?

What is the standard bike pedal size?

Bicycle pedals are commonly a 9/16″ x 20 threads per inch. The inside diameter of the internal thread (the “nut”) must be smaller. Measured in millimeters, the OD of the pedal is typically 14.2mm.

How do you know what size pedals to get?

Crank length is measured from the centre of the bottom bracket axle to the centre of the pedal axle. If you’re not sure what length the cranks on your bike are, the quickest way of finding out is typically to just look at the backside of your cranks, just below the pedal axle.

Do bike pedals have sizes?

When it comes to pedal sizes, there are two sizes: ½” and 9/16”. ½” pedals are only used on very basic bikes with a one piece crank. A one piece crank is just that, it’s one piece of steel that is bent/forged to run from one pedal, through the frame, to the other pedal.

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Are all MTB pedals 9 16?

Yes, pedals are universal for mountain bikes. Two piece and three piece cranksets use a 9/16′ inch in diameter pedals.

Are all bike pedal threads the same size?

Thread Sizes Most pedals have 9/16″ x 20 tpi threads. Pedals for one-piece cranks are 1/2″ x 20 tpi. Older French bicycles used a 14 mm x 1.25 mm thread, but these are quite rare. French-threaded pedals are commonly labeled “D” and G” (French for “droite” and “gauche” (right and left).

Why does my bike squeak when I pedal?

That creaky squeaking you hear as you pedal “could mean that [your bike] has a dry chain or bearings,” Yozell says. Cleaning and lubing your chain is usually a good place to start with any weird noise, but if it doesn’t solve the squeak, you may need to maintain or replace some bearings (see below).

Are wider pedals better?

However, bigger is not better for everybody! As the pedal gets wider, the likelihood of ground clearance concerns increases — you’ve got a greater chance of striking obstacles or dragging your pedal in the dirt around tight turns.

Do all cranksets fit all bikes?

Many chainrings are not compatible across different brands or even across different models for any given brand. Cranksets attach to a frame via bottom bracket, and there are many different types of bottom brackets.

Are longer or shorter cranks better?

Crank length changes may help solve long-simmering aches and pains, but they’re most effective when you’re doing everything you should be doing to be strong on the bike. It changes gearing. If you do end up changing crankarm lengths, it will change your gearing as well.

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Can MTB pedals be too big?

A bigger pedal gives a mountain biker added confidence when jumping and also provides more foot placement adjustment as compared to clipless pedals. A small MTB pedal for a bigger shoe size guy or gal can be uncomfortable.

Where should foot be on bike?

When placing your foot on a flat pedal, the ball of your foot should be just in front of the pedal spindle. Basically the spindle of the pedal should support the back section of the meaty part of the ball of your foot. This placement allows the rider to stay balanced when standing on the pedals.

Are bike pedals left and right?

It is often necessary to remove pedals to pack a bike for shipment. The right side pedal has a right-hand thread (removes counterclockwise, installs clockwise). The left side pedal has a left-hand thread (removes clockwise, installs counterclockwise). Many pedals are stamped “L” and “R” for left and right.

Are my pedals 9/16 or 1 2?

If the cranks are THREE PIECES, meaning two crank arms bolted to a spindle, it will be 9/16 thread on the pedals. If the crank is ONE piece through a large bottom bracket housing, it’s 1/2 thread.

Why are 3 piece cranks better?

One-piece cranks have non-sealed bottom bracket bearings that get contaminated easily. In different, 3 piece cranks come with sealed bearings protected from the elements. The result is smoother pedaling.

Do you need pedal wrench?

All modern pedals will screw into the crank arm using either one of two tools. Most pedals (like our reliable Thump flat pedals) require a pedal wrench, which is a long, thin tool specifically designed to fit the external spindle flats between the pedal and the crank leg (fig. 3).

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